Bactrian camels shed large quantities of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after experimental infection*

Dromedary camels play a significant part in the circulation and the zoonotic transmission of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Researchers demonstrated that Bactrian camels are also susceptible to MERS-CoV infection and shed large quantities of infectious virus in nasal secretions. 

Risk Factors for MERS-CoV Seropositivity among Animal Market and Slaughterhouse Workers, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2014–2017

The study investigated risk factors for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) seropositivity in animal market and slaughterhouse workers at a site previously associated with zoonotic transmission of MERS. Given the large number of camels present, including many young camels, and the mixing of camels from multiple sources, this site probably facilitates MERS transmission among camels. Results demonstrated a relatively high MERS seroprevalence in workers at this site, ranging from six percent to 19 percent at each round across all occupations. 

Researchers develop new vaccine against deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

Researchers made two versions of a potential vaccine and evaluated their effectiveness and safety in mice that were genetically altered to have more human-like immune responses. After the mice were vaccinated and then infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), both vaccines protected the mice against clinical signs of disease and death.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection Dynamics and Antibody Responses among Clinically Diverse Patients, Saudi Arabia

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) shedding and antibody responses are not fully understood, particularly in relation to underlying medical conditions, clinical manifestations, and mortality.

Efficacy of an Adjuvanted Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein Vaccine in Dromedary Camels and Alpacas

Research found that vaccination with an adjuvanted Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) Spike protein subunit vaccine confers complete protection from MERS disease in alpaca and results in reduced and delayed viral shedding in the upper airways of dromedary camels. Together, these data indicate that induction of robust neutralizing humoral immune responses by vaccination of naïve animals reduces shedding that potentially could diminish the risk of zoonotic transmission.